Sonata for Guitar (2013)
duration: 22’
GRT • 173

recording available
Return Journey
Ensemble Three plays Sonatas by Stuart Greenbaum
Lyrebird Productions, LB061116
ABC Classics, digital, 2018

Youtube excerpt (3rd movement)
elated-vid

score available from
Australian Music Centre

program note
Sonata for Guitar is dedicated to my very good friend Ken Murray. A prodigiously talented guitarist, Ken freely elected to undertake a PhD in musicology; and after a decade–long quest to find time to attend to this specialised task, he has now been admitted to the degree, Doctor of Philosophy. By way of celebration, it seemed only fitting to make good on my equally–protracted promise to write Ken a major work (having written a number of smaller pieces for him over the past 20 years). This Sonata in 3 movements was subsequently written in 18 days during December 2013. The premiere performance was given by Ken Murray on 10 November 2014 at the Wyselaskie Auditorium in Melbourne.

review
“Both discs, oddly, have a recording by its dedicatee Ken Murray of Greenbaum’s Sonata for Guitar a three-movement work with the titles ‘resolute’, ‘mysterious’ and ‘elated’. And the reason why this work is a good place to start is to explain the Greenbaum Sonata Project. The composer writes that his aim is to “create a substantial recital work for all major orchestral instruments, contributing new repertoire for professional and emerging artists…”. When it comes to this sonata, all he tells us however is that it was written ‘by way of celebration” for his friend Ken Murray who had, after several years, achieved a PhD in musicology. The style is imbued with elements of jazz that is, those typical seventh, ninths and eleventh chords with two bar or four bar passages repeated before moving on and with repetitious accompanimental patterns in, as the composer admits, a sort of minimalist language. Apparently, the sonatas “completed to date seek to push the boundaries of form, notably including minimalist architecture and the fusion of classical, modern and pop languages”.
Gary Higginson, Music Web International, August 2018